Kirk Crippens & Alan George

Side Gallery | 1.22.10 – 2.21.10

Everyone knows how to turn a house into a home but how does an abandoned home unwind back into a house? Kirk’s photographs capture a slice of that in-between world and provide a glimpse of the origin and promise of the homes that were. This collection is not a social commentary on Stockton, but the scale of its foreclosure problem affords a rich diversity of pictures of the after-home and of the adjoining farm landscape that had to make way to make possible the manufactured landscape. As often happens in art, the images have cast off the question and become beautiful objects in their own right. – Bimal Patel, July 2009

 

 

 Foreclosure, USA, Kirk Crippens 

 Foreclosure, USA, Kirk Crippens 

Wheeled Estate, Alan George

Wheeled Estate, Alan George

San Francisco, California has the highest per capita rate of homelessness of any city in the United States. This fact can be attributed to many factors, including but certainly not limited to, the predominance of social liberalism, the year round reasonably mild climate and the relatively high cost of housing in the region. Homelessness manifests itself in a spectrum of living conditions, from living on the street with shopping cart and cardboard boxes to endless couch surfing. With this series of images, Alan George examines one of the more affluent homelessness conditions, vehicle (car/truck/RV/van/bus) camping. Specifically he typographically examines the vehicles which function as homes.

 

2010 International Juried Plastic Camera Show

MAIN & SIDE GALLERIES | 2.26.10 – 4.18.10
OPENING: FRIDAY, FEB 26TH, 6-8P

Lena Kallberg

Lena Kallberg

RayKo’s Third Annual Juried Plastic Camera Show includes strange and stunning images made by the winners of this competition. Photographers from all over the Bay Area as well as national and international entries are featured in this dynamic exhibit. There were even more entries than last year, yet somehow we whittled it down to less than a hundred stellar pieces. Why is the plastic camera so popular now? Is it because the toy camera is a backlash to this digital age of photography? It could be nostalgia for the soft, square pictures with vignetted edges. It could just be nostalgia for film and the latent image- you actually have to wait to see what you shot! Or it could be love of the creak of the cheap plastic dial as you wind it, wondering if it will break off. It could be too that we all missed the simple freedom of making pictures that aren’t perfect, that don’t have to be sharp or real or saturated or taken with a camera that costs thousands of dollars. All you need is $25 (or less) and a roll of film, and you’re in business.

Jan Watten

Jan Watten

Layven Reguerro

Layven Reguerro

Highlighted in this exhibition is the work of Czech artist, Michael Borek, who was an obsessed technical perfectionist when it came to his photography, and then he met Holga. His life was never the same. She helped him let go and took him to the realm where imperfection and lack of predictability–thanks to her light leaks and lack of focus–can be inspiring. Borek did not know where this would take him, but he has enjoyed this journey. Instead of agonizing over his art, he was like a child playing with his favorite toy. Borek almost felt guilty…and then realized he might be part of a revolution…

Michael Borek

Michael Borek



Slow Burn: Klea McKenna

SIDE GALLERY: 4.25.10 – 5.30.10
OPENING RECEPTION: SUNDAY, APRIL 25TH, 4-6P

My relationship to nature lies somewhere between adoration and suspicion. This ambivalence is the source of my recent projects, which have each dealt with human perception of nature and landscape. In my current, unfinished series, “Slow Burn”, I explore the materiality of the photographic medium and it’s potential to interact with place and landscape in new ways. I work with a variety of analogue photographic methods and crude experiments to create unlikely, sometimes abstracted photographs. Using handmade cameras and large format color film and photographic paper, I record places in ecological shift, areas where open space and human stories overlap. Recent experiments have included filling the camera with river water and folding the film up so that it reacts to light as a 3-dimensional object. While photographing landscapes in ecological change, I attempt to rupture our perception and make the flawed material of the film itself visible. My methodology and aesthetic are informed by the strategies of field biology, Victorian naturalism, and homespun science; practices that employ intense and prolonged observation of nature. This exploratory approach yields abstracted images, each experiment leading to the next – 

Klea McKenna

 

 

Detail from an installation of 32 light-sensitive paper airplanes exposed to the sky over a period of eight hours at a WWII anti-aircraft lookout post. Tennessee Cove, CA, 2010

2010 3rd Annual Juried Pinhole Show

MAIN GALLERY: 4.25.10 – 5.30.10
WPPD ACTIVITIES: SUNDAY, APRIL 25TH, 12-4P
OPENING RECEPTION: SUNDAY, APRIL 25TH, 4-6P

In honor of Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day, RayKo Photo Center is hosting an exhibition of pinhole photography in the main gallery. This is a juried show of photographic work taken with pinhole cameras. On April 25th between 12-4p, RayKo will be offering free image uploads to the WPPD website, supplies for making pinhole images, and displays of pinhole cameras. The public and artists are encouraged to participate in all pinhole day activities as well as attend the reception.

FEATURED ARTIST, ATSUKO MORITA
 It takes many cells to make a living thing. A single cell does little by itself but combined with others can form anything from a spider to a human. I took multiple images of myself somewhat representing the different sides of oneself. I’d like to think of each image almost like a single cell. Each image is taken from a different perspective with the pinhole camera. I‘d like to think the images of myself represent the basics of who I am, the one part (the body) that is the house for our souls. In one way we cannot escape the shell but we don’t have to, and ultimately cannot be, judged or defined by the outward appearance. One may be born with the body of one gender but may feel inside as the other. The ear, the nose, or any part of the body can be photographed multiple times, as many times as one wants but it cannot by itself reveal the real person inside. Cells are the foundation, the building blocks of our existence but it takes the spirit or soul to give purpose and meaning as well as our personalities.

 

 

City College Portfolio Production Class

SIDE GALLERY: 6.2.10 – 6.24.10

Hiromi Otsubo

The portfolio production class is comprised of talented photographers spanning different fields, specialties, and subject matter. Our styles range from classic black and white pictorialism to postmodern techniques and nearly everything in between. A common thread throughout our class is a passion for photography and a drive to grow as artists.

The photographs are a representation of the spring semester’s portfolios which resulted from a group effort that included candid thoughtful critiques, editing, and sequencing. The show is a summation of six months work. It is certainly not the end for us as artists.

Julia Anand & Damon Sauer | Luis Delgado-Qualtrough

MAIN GALLERY: 6.2.10 – 7.20.10
OPENING RECEPTION: WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2ND, 6-8P

This exhibit features the work of Julie Anand and Damon Sauer, collaborative artists based in the Sonoran desert of Phoenix, Arizona. They shred their large scale photographs, re-organizing the parts to form new wholes. In their series Between, they are interested in questioning conventionally-defined boundaries, including the self as defined by the body’s edge. Their works relocate perspective, physically and metaphorically.

Also on display is Epigraph:  Luis Delgado-Qualtrough’s artist books that have been widely exhibited and are held in many museums, archives and private collections. The style of this San Francisco-based artist’s work has evolved from documentary photography to a cinematic approach that integrates narrative and sequential still images to create idea driven content with a social and historical message.

 

Into the Distance

Into… the distance repose self compassion the depth the everyday

SIDE GALLERY: 6.25.10 – 7.18.10
RECEPTION: JUNE 25TH, 6-8P

Six Bay Area photographers draw you in to worlds of contemplation and chaos. Ignacy Zulawski travels into the distance with a cinematic lens, Angelah Limon-Cerri pictures repose in the natural landscape, Yuri Boyko explores the self in serial images, Kevin B. Jones represents plight and perseverance with compassion, Patti Beadles tempts you with the depth of a blossom, and Steve E. Chapman uses lo-fi technology to render the everyday extraordinary.

Using a wide range of techniques in their explorations including camera phones and vintage Rolleiflexes, these photographers approach the image with curiosity and intensity.

Steve ChapmanBlue Tile Special 

{Por)trait Revealed: A Juried Exhibition of Portrait Photography

MAIN & SIDE GALLERIES: 7.28.10 – 9.10.10
RECEPTION: WEDNESDAY, JULY 28TH, 6-8P

FEATURED ARTISTS: MARK MENJIVAR & FRITZ LIEDTKE

RayKo Photo Center presents the final selections from an open call for photographic work exploring the genre of portraiture and varying characteristics of us humans.

Mark Menjivar’s You Are What You Eat is a series of portraits made by examining the interiors of refrigerators in homes across the US. For three years he traveled around the country exploring food issues. the more time he spent speaking and listening to individual stories, the more he began to think about the foods we consume and the effects they have on us as individuals and communities. An intense curiosity and questions about stewardship led him to begin to make these unconventional portraits. A refrigerator is both a private and a shared space. One person likened the question, “may i photograph the interior of your fridge?” to asking someone to pose nude for the camera. Each fridge is photographed “as is.” nothing added, nothing taken away. These are portraits of the rich and the poor. Vegetarians, Republicans, members of the NRA, those left out, the under appreciated, former soldiers in hitler’s ss, dreamers, and so much more. We never know the full story of one’s life. Mark’s hope is that we will think deeply about how we care. How we care for our bodies. How we care for others. And how we care for the land.

 

Mark Menjivar

Mark Menjivar

Fritz Liedtke

Fritz Liedtke

Fritz Liedtke’s Skeleton in the Closet is a series of intimate portraits and stories of those who struggle with eating disorders. In a society saturated with shallow, narrow definitions of beauty, anorexia and bulimia are an increasingly prevalent trend. Movie stars, magazine ads, fad diets, internet pornography, fashion models, MTV…the pressure to look thin and attractive is an oppressive force that is difficult to resist. Everyone wants to be an American Idol. But obsession with appearance is not the only motivation for restrictive eating. Dancers, gymnasts, wrestlers, models, and others, find themselves in unhealthy eating patterns in order to stay competitive. Ultimately, the disorder is really a means for controlling one part of a person’s world–a world which may, in the end, be destroyed by the disorder itself.

Faith

MAIN GALLERY: 9.16.10 – 11.5.10
RECEPTION: THURSDAY, AUGUST 16TH, 6-8P

ARTISTS
CHRISTOPHER CHURCHILL, JENNIFER HUDSON, DAVE JORDANO, EBEN OSTBY, AND BILL VACCARO

In the exhibition Faith five different photographers from around the country display selections from their projects exploring more than just religious faith, but faith in God and country and humanity. Ranging from documentary photographs to imaginary landscapes, from rich giant color prints, to small intimate bromoil and palladium prints, this exhibition has something for everyone, faithful or not.

 

 

The Last Kodachrome

MAIN GALLERY: 12.17.10 – 01.21.11
RECEPTION: FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17TH, 6-8P

 

Vesna Pavlovic

Vesna Pavlovic

KODACHROME SHOW ARTISTS:
STEPHEN ALBAIR | BEAR BEGELMAN | CORI CHANDLER-PEPELNJAK | PATRICIA CLARKE | ALEX CROWELL | LOU DEMATTEIS | ANN DONAHUE | GLENDA DREW | ALEX GREENBURG | GORDON GREENBURG | NAJIB JOE HAKIM | IRENE IMFELD | WALT JONES | ARIEL KESSLERVIVIANE MOOS | DOROTHY NORTH | VESNA PAVLOVIC | APRIL ROCHA | STEPHEN STROM | STEVEN TADDEI | ELOISE WARREN | DAVE WASSERMAN | PAT WILLARD | MARSHALL WINDMILLER

In 1935 KODACHROME was released as a 6mm home movie film, then for 35mm cameras in 1936, to huge success. In the summer of 2009, Kodak announced that Kodachrome was being “retired, concluding its 74-year run as a photography icon,” with the final rolls hitting retail shelves in early September of that year. December 2010 is the last month that Kodachrome will ever be processed, so in a juried exhibition, RayKo Photo Center celebrated the life of Kodachrome, considered by many the greatest color film ever made, the subject of popular song, and the only film to have a park named after it (Kodachrome Basin State Park, Utah). It’s the end of an era…so we paid tribute to this beautiful film and the powerful images made with it.