Artist-in-Residence | Eric William Carroll

MAIN GALLERY: 10/27/11 – 12/02/11

RECEPTION: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27TH, 6-8P

Eric William Carroll’s exhibition titled, “Plato’s Home Movies,” consists of a long blueprint photogram mural (60 ft. in length), a video projection piece, and a C-print photograph. Challenging the belief that photographs are meant to preserve moments or memories forever, Eric uses early photographic techniques from a time when light sensitive paper was used but the ability to “fix” and archive an image was not yet achieved. His subject is light itself and the ephemeral shadows it creates on the blueprint paper as it falls through trees in the forest. The show will change and fade to white throughout the course of the exhibition allowing the viewer a new experience, and the opportunity for a new memory, each visit.

Artist-in-Residence | Susan Lynn Smith

SIDE GALLERY: 10/27/11 – 12/02/11

RECEPTION: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27TH, 6-8P

On Second Thought depicts places that may not suggest a reason to linger. Upon closer examination, these environments that are often overlooked, contain subtle incongruities. The photographs reveal a peculiarity and anxiety that is present within the spaces we inhabit. A tension develops between ordinary perception and ironic estrangement; each setting feels familiar, but possesses a heightened sense of the surreal. The series invites speculative connections between images, despite one’s understanding of them as disparate locations. There is a sense of unease created in these tentative narrative threads, which implies an impending drama or one just missed.

www.susanlynnsmith.com

Open Show | Print Retrospective & Live Screening

MAIN GALLERY: 10.20.11 – 10.23.11
RECEPTION: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20TH, 5:30-7:30P
LIVE SCREENING: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20TH, 7:30-9P

Open Show organizes live events worldwide where the public can see compelling work and interact directly with the photographers, filmmakers, and multimedia producers in high-profile spaces.

We’re celebrating Open Show’s first 2 years with a special print exhibition at RayKo Photo Center featuring more than 60 photographers from 25 Bay Area shows.

The opening night will coincide with our monthly screening and feature the six presenters from the very firstOpen Show, including 2010 CPOY winner Jana Asenbrennerova and NY Times photographer Lianne Milton!

SCREENING PRESENTERS & PROJECTS

LIANNE MILTON – GUATEMALA’S GREEN HUNGER | ANDRE HERMANN – GRAFFEATS: ADVENTURES IN DINING | JANA ASENBRENNEROVA – YAK BLOOD DRINKERS | MISTY RICHMOND – BOMAS & BANDAS (CORRALS & COTTAGES) | ANUPMA SUD – HELL IN HEAVEN | ARAYA DIAZ – THE DARKEST PART OF LIGHT

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Submit your work (for free!) to Open Show’s monthly social screenings featuring 5 curated presenters (from students to professionals) showing either a 20 image project or 3‐7 minute film. We accept diverse genres including reportage, fine art, commercial, historical and more. It only takes a minute, so dust off your old work or submit a fresh project.

RAFFLE

• ThinkTank $200 value Airport Antidote® V2.0 (1)
• BorrowLenses $100 worth of rental gear (2)
• Pictopia $100 worth of drum-scanning/digital work from Pictopia (1)
• Pictopia $100 worth of photographic LightJet prints from Pictopia (1)

and more

The Brothers | Elin Høyland

MAIN GALLERY: 9.23.11 – 10.18.11
RECEPTION & BOOK LAUNCH: FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23RD, 6-8PM

When Elin Høyland heard about two elderly brothers, Harald and Mathias Ramen, living together in Tessanden, a small hamlet in rural Norway, she approached them to see if they would collaborate with her on a photographic project about their lives. The result is a fascinating and warmly human study of a way of life that has now almost entirely disappeared.

Harald (75) and Mathias (80) had always lived on the small farm in which they were born. Neither had married. Mathias once worked in Oslo for two months, but didn’t like it, whilst Harald spent one night, ‘the worst of his life,’ he would say, in a hotel in Lillehammer, some three hours away. They’d worked for an electricity company, as loggers and also as carpenters, but now much of their time was taken up just managing firewood for their home. As Harald said, they chopped wood, carried wood and burned wood. At least twice a day, they also fed wild birds in the twenty bird boxes that they monitored. Their days followed a predictable and comforting routine. In their free time they each listened to a radio or read the local paper. In the 1960s they rented a TV for a one month trial but returned it after deciding that it took up too much time. Little changed from year to year, though Mathias once said that changes were happening the whole time and it would probably end up with them getting an inside toilet with running water. Harald died from an asthma attack while shoveling snow in conditions of –20ºc. Mathias continued to live alone in the house until he moved into an old people’s home. He died in 2007.

Norwegian photographer, Elin Høyland has freelanced for several major newspapers including The Guardian. She is currently photographer with the Norwegian Business Daily and her work has been exhibited in the UK, Scandinavia, France, China and the United States. RayKo is proud to the first gallery in the U.S. to exhibit this poignant project. Elin will be here to sign copies of her book, “The Brothers” which will be available for purchase at the opening reception on September 23rd.

High Plains Drifters | Amanda Boe & Sarah Christianson

SIDE GALERY: 9.23.11 – 10.24.11

RECEPTION: FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23RD, 6-8P

“Expose a child to a particular environment at his susceptible time and he will perceive in shapes of that environment until he dies.” — Wallace Stegner, from Wolf Willow

Amanda Boe and Sarah Christianson are photographers from the two Dakotas whose paths have converged in San Francisco. Upon meeting, they discovered that their work revolved around the idea of home and the retracing of their Midwestern roots. Although they are part of a larger exodus from the plains, Amanda and Sarah are compelled to return to their respective homes to work on long-term projects. Using the context of the Midwestern landscape as a backdrop, they investigate personal histories and emotional connections to place. Throughout their work, one question persists: what is it about these places that continue to draw them back, resonate with them, and inspire their vision?

Amanda Boe

“These photographs are part of an ongoing series titled What I Hold Dear, which explores my relationship between my native home in South Dakota and my present life in California. After leaving the Midwest over a decade ago, I developed a deeper appreciation for the places that influenced my life and felt inspired to revisit them with my camera. Between 2009 and 2011, I made a series of trips back to South Dakota, seeking out places from my past that resonate with me. At the same time, I continued to photograph in California and found myself drawn to scenery that reminded me of the Midwest: open, isolated, and quiet.

My work depicts an intersection of two worlds: looking back at a place left behind and searching for a sense of place in another. Moving through landscapes and interior spaces, a narrative began to unfold as I retraced my journey thus far. The process of photographing between California and South Dakota allowed me to address the feeling of being distanced yet emotionally attached to a place I once knew so well. What remains within me, and what I hold dear, is an innate longing for the familiar feeling of home. “

Sarah Christianson

For Sarah, home will always be a 1200-acre farm in the Red River Valley of eastern North Dakota. Its original 160 acres were homesteaded in 1884 by her great-great grandfather, a Norwegian immigrant. Sarah’s parents are now the fourth, and last, consecutive generation to work their land, as she and her siblings have all moved away to pursue other careers. These circumstances provided her with the impetus to document the farm at this critical juncture.

Part of Sarah’s project focuses on the marks made upon the land. Like a palimpsest, where different layers of texts intermingle on the same reused surface of vellum, these marks are mixtures of time. They evidence natural processes and seasonal agricultural practices (planting, cultivating, harvesting), as well as older traces of habitation and the Jeffersonian grid. She also combines her images with materials from the family’s archive, such as snapshots and documents, to create a rich, multi-layered narrative that weaves back and forth through time. Homeplace is the result of what Lucy Lippard calls “the mythical search for the axis mundi, for a center, for some place to stand, for something to hang on to” (from The Lure of the Local). It is a document that pays tribute to this place, its history and uncertain future.

Fraction Magazine: 3 Years in the Making

MAIN GALLERY: 8.11.11 – 9.18.11

OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY, AUGUST 11TH, 6-8P

Fraction Magazine features the best of contemporary photography, bringing together diverse bodies of work by established and emerging artists from around the globe. Each monthly on-line issue focuses on a central theme, creating an implicit dialogue between differing photographic perspectives. This exhibition at RayKo is curated by David Bram, the founder and editor of Fraction, and features images from the past 28 issues of the magazine.

Artist-in-Residence | Don Ross

SIDE GALLERY: 08/11/11 – 09/15/11

OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY, AUGUST 11TH, 6-8P

San Francisco-based photographer Don Ross spent a year re-photographing vantages around the City that were originally pictured in a 1910 estate survey of the many tracts of land owned by famed millionaire Adolph Sutro (1830-1898). At the time of his death, the Prussian mining engineer and Nevada ‘Silver King’ owned roughly one-twelfth of The City. Best known for creating the famous Sutro Baths, “The World’s Largest,” Sutro was also notorious for fighting big money railroad interests and even served a term as Mayor.

What assured his success, however, was the acquisition of acres and acres of cheap, sandy land that few at the time wanted to occupy. On these tracts located by the beach in the ‘Outside Lands’ he built his American Dream for his family and shared his wealth with the public through access to the Baths, an adjacent museum, numerous parks and forests, and what was at the time the largest collection of books on the West Coast.

In this survey, Ross presents several large-format color views taken with a 4″x5″ film camera in contrast to the 1910 black and white enlarged originals, to show how San Francisco was shaped as its residents plowed into the 20th Century. A book containing over 30 before-and-after views will be available for purchase at the show.

Out of Site: 10th Anniversary Show

SIDE GALLERY: 06/16/11 - 07/31/11

OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY, JUNE 16TH, 6-8PM

Out of Site is a San Francisco nonprofit that provides free after school visual and performing arts programs for public high school students in San Francisco. Our programs fill a gap for teenagers-not only are they not getting enough art in their schools but there are few safe, free, fun and challenging programs for teens. Students come to Out of Site looking for the chance to experiment in the arts, and for a place to be themselves-they find artistic training, new mediums for self-expression, and a diverse and supportive community.

No Mirrors: A Juried Show of Camera-less Photography

MAIN GALLERY: 06/16/11 – 08/02/11

OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY, JUNE 16TH, 6-8PM

SUE ABRAMSON, DARRYL BAIRD, ALISON BROOKS, BRIAN BUCKLEY, JOHN CARR, MARTHA CASANAVE, MARY CELOJKO, CHRIS COLVILLE, CLARE COPPEL, AMBER CRABBE, TAYLOR CURRY, JOSEPH DEISS, ADAM DIENST-SCOTT, DANIELLE EZZO, SUSAN FELTER, ALISON HEATH, MARIE-LUISE KLOTZ, PETER KROHN, KENT KRUGH, DONNA LEVREAULT, JENN LIBBY, STAN LIPSITZ, TRACY LONGLEY-COOK, SAM MANERA, ANETTE MARWELD, AVRIL MCHUGH, MARILYN K. MOORE, JULIA NELSON-GAL, JENNY NORDQUIST, HEATHER OELKLAUS, PAT OWENS, LAURA PARKER, MAJA PILIPOVIC, JEFFREY ROBINSON, PATRICIA RUSSOTTI, GWEN SAMUELS, JAMES SCHENK, BESTY SCHNEIDER, LEAH SOBSEY, ZUS STAPEL, JOHN STECK, JR., S. GAYLE STEVENS, KEVIN TADGE, DARYL TEBBUTT, NAOMI VANDERKINDREN, MARIANA VIEIRA, GREG WILSON, RACHEL WOLF AND CLAUDIA WORNUM.

Gunpowder explosions. Iridescent dead birds. Cicada husks. Saliva. Human bodies falling from the sky. Decomposing squids emitting phosphorescence. Dolls with x-ray vision. And of course, gum.

These are just some of the things in our camera-less photography show. Come see the rest of the surprising subjects of our first exhibition involving “no mirrors,” a juried selection of images made without cameras, film, pixels or the usual means of capturing light.

Featuring nearly 50 pieces by artists from around the world.

 

City College Photo 130

SIDE GALLERY: 05.06.11 – 06.8.11
OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY, MAY 12TH, 6-8P

The Photo 130 Class at City College of San Francisco is an advanced class for students in the Photography Department to become experienced in producing portfolios of fine art or commercial photography. The class is taught by the ever-patient and humorous Bob Nishihira.

Critical Mass 2010: Across the Divide

MAIN GALLERY: 05.06.11 – 06.10.11
OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY, MAY 12TH, 6-8P

CRITICAL MASS EXHIBITING ARTISTS 2010
THOMAS ALLEMAN | JUSTYNA BADACH | CLAIRE BECKETT | KENDRICK BRINSON | CHRISTOPHER CAPOZZIELLO | TOM CHAMBERS | CHRISTOPHER CHURCHILL | SAM COMEN | KIRK CRIPPENS | MITCH DOBROWNER | NATAN DVIR | DANIELA EDBURG | MATT EICH | ETHAN EISENBERG | DIMA GAVRYSH | KEVIN GERMAN | ELIN HOYLAND | JESSICA HINES | JOSEPH O. HOLMES | NORIHISA HOSAKA | MARY SHANNON JOHNSTONE | LOLI KANTOR | DIANNE KORNBERG | ALEJANDRA LAVIADA | STEPHEN MALLON | RANIA MATAR | ANNIE MARIE MUSSELMAN | LOUIE PALU | RACHEL PHILLIPS | BENJAMIN RASMUSSEN | CHRISTOPHER RAUSCHENBERG | FRANK RELLE | JUSTINE REYES | JEFF RICH | LYNN SAVILLE | TRAER SCOTT | MANJARI SHARMA | JEFF SHENG | TIM SIMMONS, PAVEL MARIA SMEJKAL, YISOOK SOHN, S. GAYLE STEVENS, JAMEY STILLINGS, AMY THOMPSON AVISHAI | DANIEL TRAUB | KEVIN VAN AELST | ALVARO VILLELA | CORINNE VIONNET

The aim of Photolucida’s Critical Mass program is to give exposure to emerging and mid-career photographers across the globe. In 2010, 552 artists entered their work for the chance to be seen by over 200 professionals in the photography world. Curators, gallery directors, editors, and publishers juried the work of these artists, and through a truly democratic process, narrowed the field down to the Critical Mass TOP 50. Juror, Todd Hido, selected one image per artist to represent the artists’ projects. The exhibition will travel from Photo Center NW to Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, and RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco, furthering the mission of all four photography organizations to bring top emerging talent to the public. 

THE JUROR

Todd Hido is a San Francisco Bay Area-based artist whose work has been featured in Artforum, The New York Times Magazine, Eyemazing, Metropolis, The Face, I-D, and Vanity Fair. His photographs are in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of Art, Guggenheim Museum, New York, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and Los Angeles County Museum of Art, among others. He has five published books, the latest being A Road Divided (2010).

4th Annual International Juried Plastic Camera Show

MAIN & SIDE GALLERIES: 03/04/11 – 04/30/11

OPENING RECEPTION: FRIDAY, MARCH 4TH, 6-8P

FEATURED ARTISTS: MICHELLE BATES AND SAM GRANT

RayKo’s Fourth Annual Juried Plastic Camera Show includes strange and stunning images made by the winners of this competition. Photographers from all over the Bay Area as well as national and international entries are featured in this dynamic exhibit. There were even more entries than last year, yet somehow we whittled it down to fewer than ninety compelling pieces. Why does the plastic camera continue to be so popular? Is it because the toy camera is a backlash to this digital age of photography? It could be nostalgia for the soft, square pictures with vignetted edges. It could just be nostalgia for film and the latent image- you actually have to wait to see what you shot! Or it could be love of the creak of the cheap plastic dial as you wind it, wondering if it will break off. (Forget the Hipstamatic app, this is the real deal). It could be too that we all missed the simple freedom of making pictures that aren’t perfect, that don’t have to be sharp or real or saturated or taken with a camera that costs thousands of dollars. All you need is $35 (or less) and a roll of film, and you’re in business.

Also highlighted in this exhibition is the work Michelle Bates, author of the book “Plastic Cameras: Toying with Creativity.” Michelle will be teaching a special class on plastic cameras the weekend of April 23-24 in conjunction with this show. Signed copies of her book will be available at the opening where you can fall in love with Holga and Diana* and a world of other lo-tech cameras. Also featured in the exhibition is the photography of Sam Grant, whose tiny dreamlike photographs look like they were taken in 1840 instead of 2010. Come see the magic and experience nostalgia on more than one level.

*The Holga and the Diana are plastic medium format cameras that have limited controls, a fixed focal length lens, and, luckily for artists everywhere, each one is unique…

4x Africa

MAIN GALLERY: 01/27/11 – 02/26/11

OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY, JANUARY 27TH, 6-8P

Four artists, four takes on one continent. Or rather, four very different approaches to capturing the essence of what they’ve experienced in Africa. Gloria Baker Feinstein travels to Uganda photographing the orphaned children whose stories swell our hearts. Her images are at once tragic and beautiful, lyrical black and white portraits of innocence and experience. And then there is Brendan Bannon who normally photographs what others find difficult to view: refugees, AIDS patients, Somali pirates, dumpsites, but here at RayKo he will show the pictures that came in between his journeys across the continent: pastoral Africa, with images like the smallest boy minding the largest herd of camels I’ve ever seen. Another photographer, Elaine Ling has become obsessed with the Baobab tree, the gigantic trees, 1,000 years old, tower over the humans that share the land with them. Elaine, thanks to her 4×5 camera, attempts to make prints as big as the Baobab itself.Chris Smith, magazine writer and photographer based here in San Francisco, focuses on a part of Africa fewer folks think of: Urban Africa, with his raw color photographs of the unexpected beauty of some of the grittier cities on the continent. This RayKo exhibition displays four diverse

views of one mysterious and amazing place: 4xAfrica

Gloria Baker Feinstein’s Uganda: there was a war there, and there is AIDS; both have devastated entire families with broad sweeping strokes. Often children are left to fend for themselves. Sometimes they are taken in by aunts, often by grandmothers, and in many cases by an orphanage or boarding school. There is comfort in that, and there is anguish too. Baker Feinstein photographs these children and their surroundings. Sometimes the faces of the children cloud over with something she has no way of recognizing. At other times, as a mother and fellow citizen of the world, the mixture of pain and joy is all too familiar. That combination, that contradiction, that fact of life is what she has tried to address with these pictures.

Brendan Bannon is a photojournalist based in Nairobi, Kenya. He has photographed all over the continent, in Kenya, South Sudan, Somalia, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Congo. Bannon’s interest in photography was sparked by his mother, an amateur photographer with a darkroom in the bathroom, and his father, who placed him at age 10 in front of drawers of antique photographs and asked him to select the interesting ones for an exhibition on the history of photography. His interest in the medium was constant but his professional career began in 2000. During his 20′s Bannon took care of his mother who had multiple sclerosis, an experience he credits with informing his approach to photography. “I don’t shy away from difficult stories. The experience of taking care of my mother showed me clearly that behind every moment of perceived suffering there is a profound victory over circumstances. I look at people’s lives as being full of meaningful relationships, striving against the odds and achieving small victories.” The images he chose to show are from a series called “Pastoral Africa,” which are definitely a departure from his journalistic pictures of Somaliland pirates and LRA refugees in South Sudan.

Out of the arid and infertile regions of Africa, Madagascar and Australia, the Baobab Tree grows to a gigantic size, one of the largest living things in the world. With a potential lifespan exceeding 1,000 years, the miracle of this tree is that it is a renewable source of material for the essentials of life: textiles, nets, baskets and roofing. Its fruit is a rich source of nutrition and medicine. Elaine Ling is intrigued by the role that this thousand year old giant plays in the lives of its human neighbors. It is an enduring presence, perhaps older than the legends passed down from generation to generation, its roots deeply intertwined with daily existence. The images in this exhibition reflect both the resilience and transience of life as Ling partners the Baobab with a person from the community: a grandmother, a grandfather, a young man, a young woman, a mother, a boy child, a girl child. She searches for a person who happens to be living within close proximity of the tree to capture their unique relationship. This project encompasses portraits of people of many origins with their trees. These images are from Mali, South Africa, Madagascar, and Tanzania.

Mention Africa, and most people think of savannas and deserts, game parks and thatched-roof huts. Much like the rest of the world, however, Africa is rapidly urbanizing–by 2015, close to half of the continent’s population will live in cities. In South Africa, for instance, the Johannesburg metropolitan area is a mass of office towers, low-rise suburbs, and shantytowns holding almost 9 million people, with more arriving every day in search of opportunities the countryside can’t provide. Places like this are increasingly the story of how Africans live. In photos taken from Cairo to the Cape over the course of the last decade, Chris Smith has attempted to show something of these newly urban lives.