Artists-in-Residence: Kirk Crippens, Maggie Preston, & David Wolf

Exhibition Dates:  11/16/12 - 12/14/12
Opening Reception:  11/16/12, 6-8pm

The 2012 RayKo Artists-in-Residence are a diverse trio of traditional darkroom users doing very unconventional things. 

Ten Thousand Scrolls

Kirk Crippens traveled to the comparatively small city of Lishui, China, and found himself learning something he never could have grasped from his home in the East Bay. A narrow understanding of a foreign land is inevitable when knowledge simply comes from books, television, the internet and news reports. Kirk replaced that shallow information with face-to-face encounters and helped transform and broaden his understanding in ways otherwise impossible. With two 35mm cameras strapped around his neck and several dozen rolls of black and white film, Kirk went to the countryside of China with only this much Mandarin in his vocabulary: “Ni hao.” He managed to meet hundreds of people who allowed him to photograph them and who took him into their homes and into their confidence. Kirk and his understanding of China and its people will never be the same. There is an ancient Chinese saying with a simple concept that speaks to the heart of his project, "Traveling ten thousand miles is better than reading ten thousand scrolls." 

 

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Contact 

Maggie Preston's practice represents an exploration of the basic concepts of the photographic medium with her return to the photogram! In her project, Contact, the technical strategies and critical approaches employed by Preston at once explore the process and materiality of photographic objects, as well as their presentation and interpretation. She has been combining digital and hand-made negatives with silver gelatin prints and traditional darkroom techniques to document and present a world that is unrecognizable and as mysterious as the materials themselves. She states: “Because of my conceptual interests, I feel it’s essential that I learn how to merge analog and digital practices, and that a distinct hybrid approach would yield artworks that can act as metaphors for the current state of flux. On a personal note, I’m seeking a visual articulation of the restlessness that I feel as a result of having grown up straddling the divide between analog and digital.”

 

The After Life of Things

David Wolf has a love affair with the color darkroom. The After Life of Things explores the materiality of things and our relationship to them, while celebrating the wonder of the traditional darkroom in an age of its decline. Drawing a parallel between discarded objects and discontinued photo papers, images of unwanted objects are printed on a variety of papers collected from closed photo stores and the basements and closets of onetime darkroom users. The resulting prints bear witness to the mercurial effects of time and happenstance, with each print distinguished by the shifting colors and random marks of age. 

 

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Contents: Love, Anxiety, Happiness and Everything Else Critical Mass 2011

MAIN GALLERY: 5/10/12 – 6/15/12
OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY, MAY 10TH, 6-8P

 

The aim of Photolucida’s Critical Mass program is to give exposure to emerging and mid-career photographers across the globe. In 2011, over 500 artists entered their work for the chance to be seen by over 200 professionals in the photography world. Curators, gallery directors, editors, and publishers juried the work of these artists, and through a truly democratic process, narrowed the field down to the Critical Mass TOP 50. Juror, Darius Himes of Fraenkel Gallery, selected one image per artist to represent the artists’ projects. The exhibition will travel from PCNW in Seattle to Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, and RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco, furthering the mission of all four photography organizations to bring top emerging talent to the public. To view the full body of work each artist submitted you can visit here.

THE JUROR

Darius Himes is Assistant Director of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. He is a co-founder of Radius Books, a non-profit publisher of books on photography and the visual arts, where he serves on the Board and consults on project acquisitions. He was founding editor of photo-eye Booklist, a quarterly magazine devoted to photography books, which ran from 2002–2007. A lecturer, educator, and writer, he has contributed to Aperture, Blind Spot, Bookforum, BOMB, PDN, and American Photo. In 2008, he was named by PDN as one of the fifteen most influential people in photography book publishing. His most recent title, “Publish Your Photography Book,” co-authored with Mary Virginia Swanson, was released by Princeton Architectural Press in the Spring of 2011.

JUROR STATEMENT

“The picture’s smiling appearance is for your sake, so that by means of the picture the real theme may be established.”—Mathnavi, 1.2769

Curating an exhibition from a pre-established group of artists and photographs has certain obvious challenges, as well as unpredictable rewards. The parameters are simple to explain: one photograph was to be selected from small portfolios submitted by each of the fifty chosen Critical Mass artists. What will be first and most readily apparent to the viewer is the vast diversity of work. That is the first theme. A further layer is provided by the groupings of images. They are both loose and intentional, with hints of association and shades of meaning. Lastly, one arrives at individual images, each extracted from larger, and in this case, unseen bodies of work. Each image then carries with it a theme singular to itself and yet stands in for a deeper vision, while simultaneously speaking to and being informed by the other works in the exhibition. Theme upon theme hinting at other themes; a wide-ranging conversation. As Kent Rogowski’s opening piece so elegantly indicates, the ultimate Contents to be found in the works shown here speaks to Love, Anxiety, Happiness and Everything Else.—Darius Himes

CRITICAL MASS ARTISTS
JANE FULTON ALT, EVGENIA ARBUGAEVA, JESSICA AUER, MARY ELLEN BARTLEY, DANIEL BELTRA, NADINE BOUGHTON, COLETTE CAMPBELL-JONES, CHRISTOPHER CAPOZZIELLO/AEVUM, KIRK CRIPPENS, JOHN CYR, KATRINA D’AUTREMONT, SCOTT DALTON, CHRISTOPHER DAWSON, NIGEL GORDON DICKINSON, MITCH DOBROWNER, CAROLYN DRAKE, JEREMY DYER, MARK FERNANDES, MISHA FRIEDMAN, LUCIA GANIEVA, MEGGAN GOULD, GABRIELA HERMAN, SARAH HOBBS, JEROEN HOFMAN, JENNIFER HUDSON, YAAKOV ISRAEL, HEIDI KIRKPATRICK, ALEJANDRA LAVIADA, FRITZ LIEDTKE, SEBASTIAN LISTE, GLORIANN LIU, LARRY LOUIE, MARK LYON, MICHAEL MARTEN, SUSANA RAAB, JESSE RIESER, ALEJANDRO RIVAS, KENT ROGOWSKI, PHILIPP SCHOLZ RITTERMANN, GEOFFREY H. SHORT, YOUNGSUK SUH, DARO SULAKAURI, STEPHEN VAUGHAN, TOSHIYA WATANABE, DAVID WELCH, SARAH WILSON, SUSAN WORSHAM

 

Out of Site Reception

SIDE GALLERY: 5.10.12 – 6.1.12
OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY, MAY 10TH, 6:00-8:00P

 

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Out of Site Center for Arts Education provides free after school and summer programming in visual and performing arts to public high school students in San Francisco. We also offer a number of paid internships and other youth leadership opportunities. Students come to Out of Site for a chance to experiment in the arts and a place to be themselves; they find artistic training, new mediums for self-expression and a diverse and supportive community.

The exhibition also includes a collaborative project between Out of Site students and Lick Wilmerding High School students, facilitated by The American Teenager Project.

 

ARTISTS
ASHOKA ALVAREZ, JULIE AVETISYAN, KIRA BODEN-GOLOGORSKY, LILY BRENNESSEL, HEDDA CARNEY, MAX COMITO-STELLER, KARRY FAREBROTHER, KELSEY JOHE, MY DUC LY, ANNA MACKENZIE, CARLOS MONTEJANO, XANDER PEARCE, CRESCENCIO TANO, SYDNEY VACA

 

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Photos by David Lees. For more images from our reception, please visit our flickr page.

Unfolding Lives in Tohoku by Hiroyo Kaneko and Asako Shimazaki

MAIN GALLERY: 04/12/12 – 05/04/12
OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY, APRIL 12TH, 6-8P

Japanese-born photographers Hiroyo Kaneko and Asako Shimazaki, both based in San Francisco for more than ten years, will present photographs taken in Tohoku. Kaneko started returning to her hometown, Aomori, the northernmost part of Tohoku, in 2007 for her project, “Picnics.” She has continued that series as well as started two additional projects; “Harvest” and “Snow Shoveling,” using a large format camera with color film. Shimazaki traveled through that area from the late 80s to the early 90s and photographed ruins, nature, traditional places and villages with black and white 35mm film.

The exhibition will coincide with the one-year anniversary of the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami tragedy. These images of the same region from different times and approaches will share various perspectives of the artists’ lives and the local people’s lives, which may bring us a sense of hope, like a prayer for the victims.

CRAFTED AT RAYKO

SIDE GALLERY: 04/12/12 – 05/04/12
OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY, APRIL 12TH, 6-8P

JASON DUFFANY | RACHEL JABLO | ALLEN MCKINNEY

JOSH OLLEY | RON SAUNDERS | HIROSHI SUZUKI

Voyeurism & Intimacy: The Public/Private Divide in Photography

MAIN GALLERY: 03/15/12 – 04/06/12
OPENING RECEPTION: SATURDAY, MARCH 24TH, 6-8P
JUROR – TODD HIDO

The SPE member show,”Intimacy and Voyeurism: The Public/Private Divide in Photography,” juried by Todd Hido will showcase images about photography’s ongoing tensions between public and private domain, and will explore how the lines between those domains are often blurred. The following artists were selected for the exhibition:

MALENA BARNHART | SEAN BLACK | TARA BOGART | KRISTY LYNN CARPENTER | DANIEL COBURN | RACHEL COX | JESS DUGAN | MARICO FAYRE | POLLY GAILLARD | TRACIE HELLER | RACHEL HUBBARD | JULIE JONES | CHRIS JORDAN | ASHLEY KAUCSHINGER | JOHN KOBECK | JULIA KOZERSKI | JOSEPH LABATE | ANDREA LAND | SARAH-MARIE LAND | MARK LEE | ALEX LEME | NORA LEWIS | KIMBERLY LLERENA | AMELIA MORRIS | JAY MUHLIN | TERESA MUNISTERI | PEGGY NOLAN | EMMA POWELL | JULIA SCHLOSSER | | BESTY SCHNEIDER | MARTA SHUMYLO | ERNESTO SOMOZA | LEONA STRASSBERG STEINER | CLAIRE WARDEN | LAINE WYATT

JUROR

Todd Hido is a San Francisco Bay Area-based artist whose work has been featured in Artforum, The New York Times Magazine, Eyemazing, Metropolis, The Face, I-D, and Vanity Fair. His photographs are in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of Art, the Guggenheim Museum, New York, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, as well as in many other public and private collections. He has over a dozen published books, the latest monograph being A Road Divided, released in 2010.

Join us for the opening reception on March 24th when Todd Hido announces the best of show winner from this competition.

To learn more about Society for Photographic Education or the SPE national conference, go towww.spenational.org

SIDE GALLERY: 3.15.12 – 4.6.12

OPENING RECEPTION: SATURDAY, MARCH 24TH, 6-8P

CRAFTED AT RAYKO ARTISTS

SEAN DANA | RACHAEL JABLO | ALLEN MCKINNEY | RON SAUNDERS | HIROSHI SUZUKI | GORDON SZETO | PAT WILLARD

5th Annual International Juried Plastic Camera Show

MAIN & SIDE GALLERIES: 01/18/12 – 03/06/12
OPENING RECEPTION: WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18TH, 6-8P

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RayKo’s Fifth Annual Plastic Camera Show includes stunning and sometimes surprising images made by the crappy camera-toting winners of this competition (often the cameras themselves are more tape than plastic. Not just being held together with bits of electrical tape and black gaffers tape, but the tape also makes these cheap cameras light tight…not that the light leaks don’t often make the resulting pictures even more interesting). Photographers from all over the Bay Area as well as national and international artists are featured in this dynamic exhibit. Each year we receive thousands of entries and this year was another challenge to select only 100 compelling pieces. Why does the plastic camera continue to be so popular? Is it because the toy camera is a backlash to this digital age of photography? It could be nostalgia for the soft, square pictures with vignetted edges. It could just be nostalgia for film and the latent image- you actually have to wait to see what you shot! Or it could be love of the creak of the cheap plastic dial as you wind it, wondering if it will break off. (Forget the Hipstamatic app, this is the real deal). It could be too that we all missed the simple freedom of making pictures that aren’t perfect, that don’t have to be sharp or real or saturated or taken with a camera that costs thousands of dollars. All you need is $35 (or less) and a roll of film, and you’re in business. After seeing the exhibit, you may be inspired to start shooting one of these beauties yourself. Luckily RayKo is offering a class where you can reconnect with the simple joys of photography and have the ultimate plastic experience. Jeanne Hauser will be teaching a 3-week class on Plastic Cameras starting March 8th, just after the exhibition ends.

Also highlighted in this year’s plastic camera exhibit is the work of Bay Area artist, Robert Holmgren, who’s been our best of show winner in the past for his unique way of seeing this land of ours. He transforms familiar and foreign scenes with his singular vision, his beat-up camera and his special (and secret) printing technique. Come see the magic and experience nostalgia on more than one level. You can fall in love with Holga and Diana* and a world of other lo-tech cameras, like my new favorite, the Sprocket Rocket.

*The Holga and the Diana are plastic medium format cameras that have limited controls, a fixed focal length lens, and, luckily for artists everywhere, each one is unique…”

Carl Corey & Joseph O. Holmes

Wisconsin Tavern League by Carl Corey
 & Urban Wilderness by Joseph O. Holmes

Carl Corey

Carl Corey

Exhibition Dates:  12/08/11 - 01/11/12
Opening Reception:  12/08/11, 6-8pm
Book signing of Wisconsin Tavern League by Carl Corey

“In rural Wisconsin, these taverns could be the only place where a community can gather,” says Corey, 57, who was here to open his show, “and for the tavern owners they are like their living rooms.”– SFGate.com interviews artist Carl Corey.

With a view both familiar and undeniably unique, perceptibly eerie but somehow warmly inviting, photographer Carl Corey’s pictures in “Tavern League: Portraits of Wisconsin Bars” capture the Wisconsin public house as it is today. Carl’s photographs, shot with medium format film and a Hasselblad, are awash with a sense of place — the lingering tang of cigarette smoke, the feel of a gritty floor as a bar stool is pushed back, the ease of sinking into a dimly lit womb of good company and cold beer. Supernaturally vivid colors intertwine with distinctly average vignettes to reveal the magical, and fleeting, quality of these singular places and the people who love them.

A stunningly evocative collection of documentary pictures, “Tavern League” serves as a sociological snapshot. Our bars are unique micro-communities offering patrons a sense of belonging; many are the only public gathering place in the rural communities they serve. These simple taverns provide the valuable opportunity for face-to-face conversation and camaraderie, particularly as people become more physically isolated through the accelerated use of social networking, mobile texting, gaming, and the rapid-fire of email. The Wisconsin tavern presented here is an important segment of the Wisconsin community — one whose evolution, and even continued existence, stands in question in a young twenty-first century.

         Carl Corey’s work is exhibited in galleries and museums worldwide, as well as in numerous private and public collections. Carl will be at the opening reception signing copies of his book “Tavern League” as well as teaching a workshop at RayKo while escaping the Wisconsin winter. Sign up for his course “A Sense of Place: Working in the Documentary Style” being held on Sunday, December 11th.

Joseph O. Holmes, The Sledding Hill (Sunrise)

Joseph O. Holmes, The Sledding Hill (Sunrise)

         Besides a cozy bar, one also appreciates a good winter storm and the silent aftermath of deep snow and solitude. When Joseph O. Holmes walks deep into Brooklyn's Prospect Park on the first snowfall each year, he finds himself transported to the winter meadows and hills of his childhood and to the hikes and backpacking trips around the tiny Pennsylvania factory town where he grew up. At first glance, many of the snowy spaces in “The Urban Wilderness” might be mistaken for those rural scenes: stark white meadows rimmed by low hills and bare trees. But upon closer inspection, street lamps come into focus, hints of park benches appear and backpackers are revealed to be dog walkers. The wilderness and the urban details are an incongruous mix: the juxtaposition of pristine emptiness with hints of the immense human presence lurking just outside the frame. Luckily for Joseph, New York City has been buried in snow for the last few winters and he brings this glory to San Francisco this holiday season.


MARKETPLACE ARTISTS

SIDE GALLERY: 12.08.11 – 1.11.12
RECEPTION: THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8TH, 6-8P

ELLEN KONAR & STEVE GOLDBAND | SANDRA KAWANO | TONY MARIDAKIS | MAJA PILIPOVIC | DAN ROOT | DENISE TARANTINO | LAURA ALICE WATT YELENA ZHAVORONKOVA