FALL 2015 ARTISTS-IN-RESIDENCE

Kathya Landeros and Kari Orvik

Exhibition on View:  December 9, 2015 - January 15, 2016
Opening Reception:  December 9, 6-8pm
Artist's Talk:  January 10, 2-4pm

Kari Orvik

Kari Orvik, Geneva

In a city that is in a constant state of transformation, the present is almost as unreliable as the future. There is no guarantee that what you see, hear, smell and feel as you make your way through neighborhood to neighborhood will be the same from one day to the next. My current series, Geneva, is a time-sensitive personal inquiry at the intersection of Geneva Avenue and Mission Street in San Francisco’s Excelsior district.

This corner is the location of my tintype portrait studio. Over the past year I have begun to build relationships with longtime family business owners, residents who work, live and pass through this bustling intersection in order to create a document of change, presence and relationships using large format film negative, ambrotypes and tintypes, made on the street as well as in the studio. 

I recognize that my studio’s location is also a part of this neighborhood's impending transformation. For the past 9 years I have incorporated the historical photographic process of wet-plate collodion into my work as a way of understanding the changes to the environment around me. The physical nature of this handmade process and its visual allusions to the past offers a different palette of photographic possibilities to look at memory and change over time in a city that never stays the same.

Bio
Kari Orvik moved to the Bay Area from Alaska and became a photographer while working in affordable housing in San Francisco. She has set up public portrait studios in SRO’s, BART plazas, and on rooftops in the Mission. Her work focuses on memory and change over time, which she explores through the historical photographic process of tintypes. From a portable darkroom she makes long-exposure tintypes of urban landscapes that document time passing in ever-changing San Francisco neighborhoods. She also employs this process for her personal narrative project "Exercises for Moving in Between", much of which was completed at the Headlands Center for the Arts, where she was a graduate fellow. Her work has been featured on the cover of San Francisco Magazine, in exhibitions at SF Camerawork and the Headlands Center for the Arts. A graduate of Stanford University, she received her MFA at UC Berkeley, and grants through the San Francisco Foundation’s Murphy and Cadogan Fellowship and the San Francisco Arts Commission. A former studio photographer at Photobooth SF, she currently operates her own tintype portrait studio in San Francisco – kariorviktintypestudio.com.

Kathya Landeros

Kathya Landeros, HOMBRECITOS & MUJERCITAS

Within my family narrative there are many tales of hardworking kinfolk who emigrated from Mexico to the United States. It includes stories of my second great grandfather working in Arizona’s mines; my grandfather who worked as a Bracero (a bilateral government sponsored agricultural work program); and my grandmother and parents who came to California and worked as farmhands. My family’s legacy of migration has revealed to me the inextricable ties between the two countries and its people. As a Mexican-American, my work to seeks to explore this history - and photography - as a means by which to differentiate the Latino immigrant experience from the divisiveness of borderlands, violence, and poverty.

My current photographic work, Hombrecitos & Mujercitas, is a chapter of this ongoing work. It focuses on adolescent Latino youth located primarily in my hometown of Sacramento. Translated from Spanish, hombrecitos and mujercitas mean little men and little women. Using a large format camera, I have made portraits of little men and little women caught at an age between childhood and adulthood. It is a time in their life when they bear an ethereal and tender quality - something that has been most typically and historically assigned to adolescents, but rarely to young people of color.

My motivation for this project was to represent these hombrecitos and mujercitas in a manner that belies the stereotyping of Latinos, and to exemplify the impressionability and vulnerability that characterize adolescence. As hombrecitos and mujercitas face the complexities and social realities of race, gender, and class, their susceptibility is especially poignant; any misgivings we hold as a society about these young men and women not only shape our public perception of Latinos, but ultimately affect the way that young Latino men and women view and shape themselves as they enter adulthood. 

The children in these portraits are recent immigrants, from countries such as El Salvador, Colombia and Mexico. Or, like myself, they are first generation born to immigrant parents. So, they are not only straddling the worlds of childhood and adulthood but also of two cultures. I have also included portraits of my family, who served as the inspiration for this project. In particular, my nephews who never fail to warm my heart as I see them navigate the rites of passage into adulthood. In these young men and women I have met and photographed, I see semblances of the people closest to me - the people that I love the most.

Thank you Rayko Photo Center for supporting this project, and a special thanks to the students and families from Rosa Parks Middle School who opened their homes to me. 

Kathya Maria Landeros is a photographer and educator who lives and works from her hometown of Sacramento, California. Her photographic work is informed by her bi-cultural upbringing and often explores Mexican-American identity and the immigrant experience. For over a decade, she has worked on long-term personal projects documenting Latino communities throughout California’s northern Central Valley and other parts of the American West. The recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship, she has also photographed and lived in Mexico. She currently serves as a Fulbright Ambassador. Prior to earning a graduate degree in photography from Massachusetts College of Art and Design, she received an undergraduate degree in English literature and Hispanic studies from Vassar College.

Photography in France presents "A Photographers Journey 2015"

A small group of photographers journeyed through Provence, France in July 2015 as part of the workshop Photography in France led by Professor and Artist Erika Gentry. Provence, a region full of inspiration and gorgeous light is rich in history and famous for its Roman ruins, bustling markets, ancient costumes, bull games and scenic landscapes explored by the likes of Vangogh, Koudelka and Picasso among others. See the photographers at work and their slideshows and consider joining us yourself during this week: July 11-18 2016

Registration is open.  www.photographyinfrance.com

Artists: Henry Bortman, Erika Gentry, Maxine Heiliger, Wendy Mann, Jim Miglian

IMAGINARIUM

A VISUAL COLLECTION FROM DE ANZA COLLEGE PHOTOGRAPHY STUDENTS

SIDE GALLERY
EXHIBITION OPENING: NOVEMBER 4TH, 6-8PM
EXHIBITION ON VIEW: NOVEMBER 4TH - DECEMBER 4TH, 2015

The imagery on view has been chosen from various classes at De Anza College and is representative of the high quality and imaginative work being produced by its students.  Exhibited work has come from courses offered in everything from traditional to digital, experimental, and studio techniques.  All work has been completed during the 2014-2015 school year.  A rich and diverse student body is expressed through our Imaginarium.

YOU'LL FIND IT WHERE IT IS

INSTALLATION & PHOTOGRAPHS BY SONJA THOMSEN

EXHIBITION OPENING: NOVEMBER 4TH, 6-8PM

EXHIBITION ON VIEW: NOVEMBER 4TH - DECEMBER 4TH, 2015

Sonja Thomsen

RayKo Photo Center is pleased to announce the opening of Sonja Thomsen’s site-specific installation, You’ll Find it Where It Is. Thomsen is using this show as an opportunity to pull and tease out one part of the larger Glowing Wavelengths In Between exhibition that was featured at the DePaul Art Museum in Chicago earlier this year. Glowing Wavelengths in Between is, in the artist’s words, “a rumination on the very physicality of seeing.” In the words of Gregory Harris, curator at the DPAM, “Sonja Thomsen’s photographs and installations create a tangible means to experience the ephemeral qualities of light, recalibrating our perceptions of the visible world. Her photographic and installation work springs from extensive studio-based experimentation with optical phenomena and from research on philosophical debates about the fluidity of objective scientific knowledge. Thomsen finds inspiration in an array of sources from the optical experiments of Sir Isaac Newton to the musings of inventor Buckminster Fuller and the manifestos of artist and designer László Moholy-Nagy. Utilizing an array of materials that refract and reflect light, her artistic practice embraces improvisation and iteration as means to creative discovery. The resulting pieces—vibrant color photographs, intricate collages, immersive murals, faceted metallic sculptures—fluidly shift between direct documentation and destabilizing abstraction. Thomsen’s layered works transform the exhibition space through delicate gestures that elicit wonder at the most quotidian elements of light, space and time.”

Sonja Thomsen asks the question, “How do we locate ourselves in the world?” The response is this exhibition at RayKo Photo Center. We locate ourselves in a multiplicity of ways, an always shifting matrix, never a fixed point. Each of Thomsen’s works strive to function as a mode of measuring that locale, a way to assess the space between the mountain, the self and the light. Guided by rigorous material experimentation, she channels the ensuing synergy in the studio as catalyst for construction. Informed by her training in photography, light and space function as the foundation of her work, each piece aiming to assess the space between, where knowledge is always in a state of becoming. Thomsen’s multifaceted practice includes sculpture, interactive installation, photography and site-specific public art.  She embraces interactivity, constructing experiences reflective of our own perceptions of light, limitations of knowing, and the potential of emptiness. The latest incarnation of these culminating ideas is the installation for RayKo, using the curves and angles and light of our building’s interior to create You’ll Find It Where It Is.*

The history of women represented in the light and space movement has become a point of focus as Thomsen has been developing the installation, choreographing light, image and experience. Often times, work by these female artists such as Mary Corse and Helen Pashgian seems to be overlooked. As a practicing female artist in this field, Thomsen feel this art history is incomplete. She’s interested in further investigating these female pioneers as well as exploring current practices of women working with light and space installation. Her work is an extension of this research, building on history, part of a dialogue across time and space. Thomsen’s use of retro reflective glass beads is a direct reference to Mary Corse’s painting with the same material.

Sonja Thomsen’s exhibition is a one-time-only site-specific installation just for RayKo Photo Center’s unique space. Come meet the artist, experience her interpretation of our building and its light and reimagine what photography may or may not be. This exhibition will be on view through December 4th, 2015.

*The origin of the title came from this excerpt from the book A Madman Dreams of Turing Machines by Janna Levin.  It’s at the beginning of the book as she introduces Kurt Godel.  

Sonja Thomsen (b. 1978) is a Milwaukee-based artist whose multifaceted practice combines photography, sculpture, interactive installation and site-specific public art to create spaces reflective of our own perceptions and potential.  Since earning an MFA in photography at the San Francisco Art Institute (2004), she has exhibited with Higher Pictures, DePaul Art Museum, Center for Photography at Woodstock, the Reykjavik Museum of Photography, New Mexico Museum of Art, Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, Gallery f5,6 in Munich among others. Thomsen's work resides in the collections of the Milwaukee Art Museum, Reykjavík Museum of Photography and the Midwest Photographers Project at Museum of Contemporary Photography. Accolades include the Mary L. Nohl Fellowship for Individual Artists, Milwaukee Arts Board New Work Commission, Digital Artist in Residence at Columbia College Chicago and a Hermitage Artist Fellowship.   Sonja Thomsen is a member of the international photography collective Piece of Cake – POC and co-director of The Pitch Project. 

Thomsen is a Lecturer at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. 

Side Gallery: 81 Bees Collective

September 23 - October 30, 2015

The 81Bees is a collective of photographers with a wide range of interests, experience and backgrounds. By working in cooperation, the members create an environment that encourages the growth of artistic vision and technical mastery.

FEMME PAPEL

UNIQUE PRINTS BY JOHNNA ARNOLDJENNA KUIPERVANESSA MARSHKLEA MCKENNAMAGGIE PRESTONMEGHANN RIEPENHOFF, AND SONJA THOMSEN

September 23 - October 30, 2015


SPRING 2015 ARTISTS-IN-RESIDENCE

ELIZABETH MORAN & PACCARIK ORUE
EXHIBITION:  AUGUST 5 - SEPTEMBER 18, 2015
OPENING RECEPTION:  WED, AUGUST 5, 6-8PM

Paccarik Orue, Repartiendo queso y leche, 2013

Elizabeth Moran


SIDE GALLERY

SAN FRANCISCO NEON:  SURVIVORS & LOST ICONS
AL BARNA & RANDALL ANN HOMAN

EXHIBITION ON VIEW:  AUGUST 5 - SEPTEMBER 18, 2015
RECEPTION & BOOK SIGNING:  WED, AUGUST 5, 6-8PM

They are as much a part of the San Francisco landscape as the bay, the cable cars, and the city’s spectacular views. But despite their enticingly bright presence, they are often overlooked. Not anymore. With the publication of a new book, San Francisco Neon: Survivors and Lost Icons (Giant Orange Press), authors Al Barna and Randall Ann Homan shed new light on the backdrop and the history of the city’s neon signs, the luminous beacons that help tell the story of the town’s neighborhoods, its nightlife and its fun-loving nature.

“The San Francisco we usually think of is a bird’s eye view of hills and architecture,’’ Homan said. “We wanted to present a view of the city from the sidewalk, looking up at these remarkable neon signs that are an integral part of the urban landscape.’’

The couple spent five years working on the project, searching out the city’s vast patchwork of neon signs, dating back to the 1930s Art Deco era, like the Vogue and Curren theaters “blade’’ signs. While the book displays more than 200 classic neon signs still lighting up San Francisco’s diverse neighborhoods from the Marina to the Mission, one of the unfortunate discoveries of the book’s research was how many great works of neon art have been lost over the decades.  “Even in the five years since we started work on the book, dozens of neon signs have been removed from the city’s landscape,’’ Barna said. “It’s our hope that this book will serve as a catalyst for San Franciscans to preserve legacy neon signs.’’

As San Francisco Neon so vividly illustrates, the signs represent many of the places where generations of city residents have met to watch movies, drink martinis, buy raviolis and even park cars. Some of the iconic signs include the sleepy moon at the Nite Cap, the laughing chef at Original Joe’s and the neon fish which reminded tourists what Alioto’s restaurant features at Fisherman’s Wharf.  The neon signs dotting San Francisco’s landscape cover just about every conceivable business and cut across almost all cultures and lifestyles, whether they are high-end hotels or small mom-and-pop markets. Neon graced the fronts of motor lodges, auto dealerships, liquor stores, funeral parlors and of course, dive bars. What could be more enticing than a large, red, tilted martini glass? Depending on the hour, maybe an oversized donut splashing into a cup of coffee.

As the authors discovered, neon signs made even the most mundane storefront memorable. The appeal of neon at night is the atmosphere it creates, where even a quiet street could be turned into a movie set. And neon art reminds us of our past, representing decades of survival against all odds and the onslaught of relentless gentrification.  San Francisco Neon tells a story that punctuates the night sky and lures us to experience a disappearing side of San Francisco. They may seem like relics from the past, but they continue to sparkle in the neighborhoods and destinations that make San Francisco such a quirky, colorful city of lights.

Praise for San Francisco Neon
Lush photography book illuminates San Francisco’s neon history... | Jim Van Buskirk, SF Examiner
San Francisco once basked in the glow of neon... Carl Nolte column, San Francisco Chronicle 
Book to focus on San Francisco neon... | David Weinstein on the Eichler Network



DARRIN - JAMIL HELLU

Side Gallery
EXHIBIT DATES:  JUNE 25 - JULY 31, 2015
OPENING RECEPTION:  THURSDAY, JUNE 25, 6-8PM

In 2005, I heard the news of two teenage boys who were publicly hung in Iran on charges involving homosexual behavior. Of the few published photographs of the episode, the most shocking to me was an image of the boys, blindfolded, just moments before their death on the scaffold. Thinking about ways to counter homophobia, I began to depict my own life in my photography with the aim to challenge stereotypes usually represented in mainstream media.

I started to photograph my partner Darrin as an expression of love, aware that relationships such as mine continue to struggle for acceptance and social justice in many parts of the world. This ongoing series relates to a personal journey of discovery, self-reliance, and affirmation, especially for those of us who venture to establish a sense of encouragement and historical inclusion.

My intention is to shift away from the stereotypical sexual predictability usually permeating representations of gay men, focusing on ordinary moments and personal experiences, as Darrin and I share our lives together.

Originally from Brazil, Jamil Hellu earned his MFA in art practice from Stanford University in 2010 and was granted a BFA degree in photography from the San Francisco Art Institute in 2003. He was selected for the Artist-in-Residence Program at Recology San Francisco in 2014. Hellu received the MFA Graduate  Fellowship Award at Headlands Center for the Arts for 2010–2011. He was also granted a six-month residency at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris in 2008. He lives in San Francisco. www.jamilhellu.net

TRANSCUBA - MARIETTE PATHY ALLEN

EXHIBIT DATES:  JUNE 25 - JULY 31, 2015
OPENING RECEPTION:  THURSDAY, JUNE 25, 6-8PM

“All of the subjects in TransCuba are old enough to have experienced the political oppression not just of trans life but also of homosexuality. Allen visits them at a time when they have newfound freedom, after a shift has occurred not only in governmental policy but also in the culture around them, toward acceptance and understanding.” — Allen Frame, photographer, curator, activist, writer-director

Mariette Pathy Allen

For more than 30 years, American photographer Mariette Pathy Allen has been documenting transgender culture worldwide; in 2004 she won the Lambda Literary Award for her book The Gender Frontier. In her latest series, TransCubawhich was published last year to critical acclaim in a monograph of the same title by Daylight Books, Allen captures the transgender community of Cuba through vibrant color photographs. Her images document the details of the everyday lives of her subjects engaging with family and friends and the community at large, revealing the growing visibility and acceptance of transgender people in a country whose government is transitioning into a more relaxed model of communism under Raúl Castro's presidency.

A selection of Allen's photographs from TransCuba will be the subject of a solo exhibition at the Rayko Photo Center in San Francisco. The opening reception and book signing with Mariette Pathy Allen will take place Thursday, June 25 from 6-8pm. The exhibition is timely as it takes place as President Barack Obama seeks to restore diplomatic relations between the United States and Cuba which have been severed since 1961.

Ms. Castro Espín, the director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education (CENESEX), contributes a preface to the book. CENESEX is a government-funded body best known for advocating tolerance of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender issues on the island.TransCuba also includes an introduction by Allen Frame, and an essay by Wendy Watriss. The text is published in English and Spanish.

The central subjects of TransCuba are AmandaNomi and Malu, three remarkable people with whom Allen formed close bonds during visits she made to Cuba in 2012 and 2013. Allen photographed them in the privacy of their homes, at restaurants and clubs, at the beach, on the streets of Havana, and at performances and special events. The transgender people Allen depicts in TransCuba savor their new freedom to be themselves publicly, while continuing to overcome challenges such as health issues and lack of steady work and money. The photographs and supporting interviews provide an intimate and multi-layered portrait of Cuba and this special community of people that is very different from the stereotypical, one-dimensional depiction of transgender people we are so often accustomed to seeing in photographs and in films.

Mariette Pathy Allen has been photographing the transgender community for over 30 years. Through her artistic practice, she has been a pioneering force in gender consciousness, contributing to numerous cultural and academic publications about gender variance, and lecturing throughout the globe. Her first book Transformations: Crossdressers and Those Who Love Them was groundbreaking in its investigation of a misunderstood community. Her second book The Gender Frontier is a collection of photographs, interviews, and essays covering political activism, youth, and the range of people that identify as transgender in mainland USA. She has also been a valuable consultant to several films about gender and sexuality. Her life's work is currently being archived by Duke University's Rare Book and Manuscripts Library, and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's Studies. Mariette lives in New York City with a rotating cast of friends and loved ones. 

Recent Press:
SFChronicle
Bay Area Reporter
Don't Take Pictures
KQED
F-Stop Magazine
InQueery

ALSO FEATURING IMAGES BY ANJA MATTHES
FROM HER LONG TERM PROJECT ON NYC LGBTQ KIKI BALLROOM CULTURE

Kiki Ballroom is an ongoing project by Anja Matthes that visually explores the underground NYC Kiki Ballroom scene, a community organized by LGBTQ youth of color, which provides an alternative to high-risk behaviors, as well as a support system for a marginalized group that is frequently a target of violence, homelessness, racism, and homophobia. Today there are approximately 10 active Kiki “Houses” in NYC. A House functions as a surrogate family for youth often abandoned by their parents, collectively empowering and educating their members. Weekly practices and meetings lead to events called Kiki balls, which are judged competitions infused with a positive HIV education message. Performers are awarded prizes in categories such as voguing, realness, and runway based on their handmade avant-garde creations and performance in dynamic battles. 

Lindsay Morris: You Are You

EXHIBIT DATES:  MAY 14 - JUNE 19, 2015
OPENING RECEPTION AND BOOK SIGNING:  THURSDAY, MAY 14, 6-8PM

Lindsay Morris, You Are You

You Are You documents an annual weekend summer camp for gender-nonconforming children and their families.This camp offers a temporary safe haven where children can freely express their interpretations of gender alongside their parents and siblings without feeling the need to look over their shoulders.

In 2007 Lindsay Morris started attending camp with a loved one. It was with a great deal of courage in 2012, that the camp parents and children agreed to have selected images published as the cover story of the New York Times Magazine. This started what we all agreed was a very important and timely dialogue in a public forum. Since then this story has been published in France, Italy, Germany, Israel, Australia and Eastern Europe, demonstrating a global interest in the predicament of gender-independent youth. 

Click here to see to see the latest on Lindsay's project on TIME Lightbox!
Click on the publications below to see more You Are You press:
PDN Photo of the Day
BBC News
San Francisco Chronicle
New York Times Magazine
Bay Area Reporter
SFWeekly
more SFWeekly
KQED
Slate/Behold

About the Artist: 
Born and raised in suburban Detroit, Lindsay Morris resides on the East End of Long Island with her husband and two sons. Her passion for photography began at age 18, when she was given her first camera while spending a year in South Africa as a Rotary Youth Exchange student. Since 2006, she has been photo editor for Edible East End magazine, where she documents the food culture on Long Island.

Lindsay’s work has been published in the New York Times Magazine (cover story), GEO Germany and GEO International, Days Japan, Loupe, PDN, Marie Claire, Elle, Internazionale, Haaretz Israel, and Sunday Life Australia and has been featured on photography blogs L’Oeil de la Photographie, WPO, Fraction, Slate/Behold and abcNews.com. She was a 2013 Critical Mass finalist and nominee for the 2013 Julia Margaret Cameron Award. 

Recent exhibitions include Outono Fotografico Festival, Spain, Sous Les Etoiles Gallery, NY, The Fence and Photoville, Atlanta and Brooklyn, NY, a solo show at the Center for Fine Art Photography, Fort Collins, CO and a selected Ctrl+P artist at the Catherine Edelman Gallery, Chicago. 

Her book, You Are You, which documents a weekend summer camp for gender-nonconforming children and their families, will be released in April 2015 in collaboration with Kehrer Verlag.

Lindsay began her studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and holds a BFA from the University of Michigan School of Art. 

San Jose State University Graduate Photography Students

OPENING RECEPTION: MAY 14TH, 6-8PM
EXHIBITION ON VIEW: MAY 14TH - JUNE 19TH, 2015

Isabel Brewer

The SJSU Photography Graduate Program supports and encourages a wide range of traditional, conceptual and interdisciplinary approaches to lens related imaging. Philosophically, the program is committed to addressing the breadth of contemporary issues and practices while realistically preparing the students for a career in the field. The faculty is comprised of artists/photographers with national and international careers whose work ranges from conceptual installation and new genres to traditional and commercial. There is no pervasive aesthetic trend at SJSU; our program welcomes and promotes diverse image making styles and viewpoints.

8th Annual International Juried Plastic Camera Show

EXHIBIT DATES:  MARCH 11 - MAY 3, 2015
OPENING RECEPTION:  WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 6-8PM

FEATURED ARTISTS:  ERNIE BUTTON & JENNIFER SHAW

AWARD WINNERS:

Selected works by:
Thomas Alleman, Lilyan Aloma, Ben Altman, Alison Amick, M. Apparition, Jennifer Bacon, Dina Beigelman, Doug Birnbaum, Christa Blackwood, Richard Bonvissuto, John Bridges, Laura Brodax, Maggie Corwin, David Cory, Chris Cranford, David Cuetter, Carol Dass, Petra Davis, Dana Day, Adrienne Defendi, Barbara Dombach, Diane Durant, Jill Ensley, Diane Fenster, Don Feria, Mark Fisher, Brittonie Fletcher, Heather Frandsen, David Gardner, Dave Getzschman, Paula Rae Gibson, Brian Gliniak, J.M. Golding, Nancy Goodrich, Daniel Grant, Matthew Hanson, Tonee Harbert, L. Herrada-Rios, Robert Holmgren, Karen Janas, Randy Jennings, Priscilla Kanady, Marky Kauffmann, Ellie Kingsbury, Rocky Kneten, Nathan Koch, Ian Kramar, Jacqulyn Laffitte, Susan Lapides, Patty Lemke, Phoebe Lickwar, Lisa Lindamood, Eric Lindbloom, Janis Crystal Lipzin, Ernie Luppi, Erin Mahoney, James Malsich, Marco Marassi, Anette Marweld, Aleksandra Miesak, Reena Nemirovsky, Ron Orlando, Eben Ostby, Cynthia Pastore, Ludovico Poggioli, Vicki Reed, Deon Reynolds, Guy Reynolds, Jim Rohan, Danny Sanchez, Robert Schneider, Cromwell Schubarth, BK Skaggs, Yon Sim, Antonia Small, Jon Soliday, Arlene Stanger, Michael Starkman, Cody Swanson, Yuri Syuganov, Steven Taddei, Jonathan Trundle, Jacqueline Walters, Laura Alice Watt, Jan Watten, Allison Webber, Ed Wheeler, Jessica Wildman, Jonas Yip, Christine Zona

To see photographs from opening night, click here!
To read the PDN article about the show, click here!

Hurricane Story by Jennifer Shaw
ISBN: 978-0-9844576-3-2
$18 US/ 6.75″ x 6.75″
BROKEN LEVEE BOOKS, An imprint of Chin Music Press

Hurricane Story is a spellbinding odyssey of exile, birth and return told in forty-six photographs and simple, understated prose. This first-person narrative told through dreamlike images of toys and dolls chronicles one couple's evacuation from New Orleans ahead of the broken levees, the birth of their first child on the day that Katrina made landfall, and their eventual return to the city as a family. Shaw's photographs, at turns humorous and haunting, contrast deftly with the prose.

This clothbound hardcover edition includes an introduction by Rob Walker, author of Letters From New Orleans and former "Consumed" columnist for The New York Times Magazine.

A Changing Mission

TO WHOM DOES SAN FRANCISCO'S OLDEST NEIGHBORHOOD BELONG?

Carlos Avila Gonzalez

The Mission District has long been a neighborhood where immigrants could grab a foothold in the city. Yet over the past few years, San Francisco's oldest neighborhood has also become one of its most desirable. For eight months reporters and photographers spent time getting to know residents and merchants near the block of 24th Street between Shotwell and Folsom — known as the heart of the Mission — to document the change they are experiencing.

Project Contributors:
Erin Brethauer, Katie Brigham, Joe Garofoli, Kristen Go, Michael Grant, Carlos Avila Gonzales, Mike Kepka, Pete Kiehart, Leah Millis, Frank Mina, Ben Muessig, Jake Nicol, Tim O’Rourke, Joaquin Palomino, Warren Pederson, Carolyn Said, Lea Suzuki, Jim Trotter and Judy Walgren

Click here to read more about this story in the San Francisco Chronicle

The Visual Voice: New Photo Book Narratives

EXHIBITION DATES:  FEBRUARY 5 - MARCH 3, 2015

Tate Shaw

Tate Shaw

A CONTEMPORARY LOOK AT NARRATIVE IN PHOTO BOOKS, WITH ARTISTS FROM ARGENTINA, AUSTRALIA, BRAZIL, CHINA, THE CZECH REPUBLIC, ENGLAND, MEXICO, RUSSIA AND THE USA. THIS SHOW FEATURES BOOKS AND PRINTS BY THE FOLLOWING ARTISTS:

Stephen AlbairLuis DelgadoJose DinizMcNair EvansLydia GoldblattToni GreavesLorena Guillén VaschettiPatricia LagardeMarcus LyonDiana MatarClifton MeadorCarlos Javier OrtizDavid PaceDarcy PadillaLuis Palacios KaimJana RomanovaTate ShawLiz SteketeeArthur TressImrich VeberWenxin Zhang, and Philip Zimmermann

To see videos of some of the books, click on the names below:

Luis DelgadoJose Diniz, McNair EvansCarlos Javier OrtizDarcy Padilla, Jana RomanovaTate ShawImrich Veber, Wenxin ZhangPhilip Zimmermann

To see additional videos of our books on exhibition, click here!

Provence: A Photographic Journey

SIDE GALLERY
PHOTOGRAPHY IN FRANCE CLASS OF 2014 PRESENTS
"Provence: A Photographic Journey"

Exhibit Dates:  January 7 - February 1, 2015
Opening Reception:  January 7, 6-8pm

Seven photographers journeyed through Provence, France in July 2014 as part of the workshop "Photography in France" led by Professor Erika Gentry. Provence, a region rich in history is famous for its Roman ruins, bustling markets, ancient costumes, bull games and scenic landscapes explored by the likes of Vangogh, Koudelka and Picasso among others. Come see photographs made by workshop participants inspired by the region its beautiful light. www.photographyinfrance.com

Artists: Harlan Crowder, Lorraine Crowder, Mary desJardins Marsha Guggenheim, Ralph Guggenheim, Edie Scott Hoffman and Prof.  Erika Gentry.

RUBI LEBOVITCH, HOME SWEET HOME

Exhibit Dates:  January 7 - February 1, 2015
Opening Reception:  January 7, 6-8pm

My photographs deal with domestic scenes captured in straightforward images. The scenes can be divided in to two main categories: inanimate objects and human scenarios. Both categories are characterized by mystery, vagueness and absurdity. I create a twist in familiar sights and build new contexts, thus endowing the scene with new meaning. Mundane objects and domestic spaces are transformed into something strange and surprising. Like in surreal paintings, a new and impossible reality is created.